Know here facts about 17th century’s Magic Studded Dress discovered in Palmwood sank in Dead Sea

Middle East: The Organization of Treasures, burials and antiquities of the Arab world has recently shared an update regarding which the scientists uncovered discovery of a 'magic studded dress'

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Know here facts about 17th century’s Magic Studded Dress discovered in Palmwood sank in Dead Sea
Know here facts about 17th century’s Magic Studded Dress discovered in Palmwood sank in Dead Sea (image credits Facebook)

Middle East: The Organization of Treasures, burials and antiquities of the Arab world has recently shared an update regarding which the scientists uncovered discovery of a ‘magic studded dress’ which is found in a ship named ‘Palmwood’ which sank in a dead sea around in the Netherlands in 1650, (17th century).  

According to the updates, the antiquities department officials stated that “It stayed preserved under the sea for centuries. Scientists reveal the secrets of the magic studded dress that has been preserved under the sea for centuries.”

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Furthermore, the scientists confirmed that almost eight years after a nearly perfectly preserved women’s dress was emerged from a ship that sank off the Netherlands in the 17th century, it seems historical investigators have finally come to know some secrets of the “magic dress.”

According to a New York Times article, the ship, known as Palmwood, sank around 1650 off the Dutch island of Texel and remained under the sand until 2014, when Dutch amateur divers found the dress, almost perfectly preserved, and brought it ashore according to the Turkey hashtag website.

Moreover, the divers, too, found a variety of silver dresses, book covers and what appears to be 17th-century women’s toiletries, and other things. The well-preserved silk dress has attracted thousands of visitors during the winter months since its display in November, said Corina Hordijk, art director at the Island Museum to the newspaper.

Additionally, the newspaper says the dresses, probably made thirty years before she sank with the ship, had “a wide waist that indicated they were likely an older woman.” Besides, experts told the newspaper that the silver dress may have been a wedding dress, which might mean the two dresses had different owners.

On his part, Arnold van Brogan, a documentary director on the subject, was quoted as saying, “those dresses were incredibly expensive,” adding, “These dresses were not to be seen outside of royal tile circles.”

Notably, there are three possibilities about the owners of these dresses that they belong to members of the upper classes, the other that they belong to an English theatre company. 

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The third, based on research conducted by a historian at Oxford University, is that the clothes, as well as other items, belonged to the wife of the ambassador of England in Constantine, who died then.

Tariq Saeed

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